Entertainment

The career of Lisa Bloom

The career of Lisa Bloom has made a vocation out of representing the underdog. She hosts well-planned press conferences, so women can tell their stories about being wronged by powerful men. She harnesses the media to have results once the courtroom isn’t enough.

She’s the daughter of famous women right’s lawyer Gloria Allred. Based on Politico, “The names Allred and Bloom are synonymous with an aggressive legal strategy on behalf of wronged women, and relentless public-relations campaigns against rich and influential men.”

However, in 2017 the world learned she was working for alleged sexual assaulter Harvey Weinstein. Bloom went from being called “a defender of women” on the cover of a publication to having her mother push out a statement saying she’d work with any Weinstein accusers, even when that meant taking on Bloom in court.

Before the backlash, Bloom had represented the women who accused actor Bill Cosby and Fox News anchor Bill O’Reilly of sexual harassment and abuse. She tried to describe a lady who desired to press charges against President Donald Trump. Nonetheless, it never eventuated. After the backlash, she’s still working, such as for sexual offender Jeffrey Epstein’s accusers.

She said it made sense because she was passionate about women’s rights, civil rights, racial discrimination, and LGBT rights. Her mother had been telling her to offer law school a go. After UCLA, she went to Yale Law School ad graduated in 1986.

In 1997, Bloom and her mother Allred tried to sue the Boy Scouts of America for not allowing Katrina Yeaw to join since she was a girl. The case was dismissed while the BSA wasn’t a business, which meant it could control who’s allowed to be members.

While working for Allred’s law firm, she also worked on a case against the Roman Catholic Church about child sex abuse, and she sued the LAPD. Bloom continued to work on her mother’s firm until 2001.

Allred had worked on high-profile cases, including representing Nicole Simpson’s family during the O.J. Simpson trial, representing Norma McCorvey from Roe v. Wade, along suing Tiger Woods, Charlie Sheen, and Roman Polanski.

Bloom told the San Fernando Valley Business Journal her mother showed her how important it was to push the law forward for women. She’d be honored if people compared her to her mother.

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Based on the Los Angeles Times, it’s a signature move that she learned from her mother. But they’ve their differences. While Allred loves to sit at a long table on a telephone directory for extra height, Bloom prefers to stand, and she likes to use visual aids.

In 2017, she said she needed to be creative in her work. She couldn’t depend on the courtroom alone. “We use the media, for instance, to publicly shame people. That tends to level the playing field.”

Bloom’s career became popular during and after O.J. Simpson’s heavily reported trial. She harnessed the growing attention for real-life crime cases, often appearing as an expert on network news shows like CNN and MSNBC.

She said her time as a host was plenty of fun focusing on air for just two hours per day, five days a week, and it helped teach her to break down legal jargon into words that were understandable for those who weren’t lawyers. She’d continue to do this as an attorney.

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